featured on VoyageHouston!

featured on VoyageHouston!

voyagehoustonfeature

Hey, how about that? Exciting! Check out my interview on Voyage Houston.

It’s always great to have organizations who are promoting local artists. And I am amazed at the timing. This opportunity popped up during an intense summer season that I have not been able to get into the studio. This little nod has been such an encouragement. It feels like the universe is saying, “I see you. I know you’re still there and doing the best that you can. Nothing is wasted. You will paint and create again.”

Here’s the link:
On the site, you can find it in the Thought-Provokers series midway down the homepage as part of the Sugar Land collection.

 

hope rising

hope rising

already-on-mars2

already on mars | acrylic and oil stick on canvas | 24 x 36 | SOLD

So excited to have one of my paintings hanging in the art show for the Hope Rising- South Central Regional Women’s Worship Event, hosted by One River Vineyard Church. The event is taking place on Feb 23 at 7 PM to Feb 24 at 5 PM at the Vineyard Church of Houston, 1035 E 11th St, Houston, Texas 77009. Tickets available here. My painting, Already on Mars, will remain up for the month, in case you are unable to attend the event.

This painting was inspired by the movie, Hidden Figures, the story of a team of female African-American mathematicians who served a vital role in NASA during the early years of the U.S. space program.

I have been awakened to the stories of hope over time. Hope held out with such grace and tenacity generation after generation of not seeing change. It would be easier to give up, to put blinders on, to numb out, than daring to hope, climbing those rungs of that ladder only to fall all the way to the bottom again. But hope is also outrageously difficult to extinguish.

Al Harrison speaking to Katherine Coleman in the movie Hidden Figures:

“What I’m asking you…what I’m asking everyone one in that room, all my geniuses, is to look beyond the numbers. To look around them. Through them. For answers to questions we don’t even know to ask. Math that doesn’t yet exist. Because without it, we’re not going anywhere. We’re staying on the ground. We’re not flying into space…we’re not circling the earth. And we’re certainly not touching the moon. And in my mind…I’m already there.”

Hope is inspiration. Hope is rebellion. Seeing beyond the establishment, tradition, and behaviors that have been normalized, hungrily seeking out what is not yet certain because you know in your depths there is more. The spark of hope exists because in your mind, sometimes even before you’re willing to admit it to yourself, you’re already there.

In my painting, I created one vision of Mars. It feels a little upside down, seen from a distance, and yet we reach, we rise, because of the hope that we have.

100 Days

100 Days

I just finished up participating in my first 100 Days Project. It was a course by Daring Discoveries called 100 Days of Building Creativity, facilitated by LeeAnn Hilbrich.

I committed to spending a minimum of 10 minutes a day in my art studio creating and producing art. For I while, I have felt the imbalance of being a viewer/consumer of art more than a participant/producer and I needed more than that. Broken down simply, creating helps keep me sane. It’s how I process my world. It helps me stay true to myself.

I kept my goals very small so that I could approach my daily practice with the minimal amount of obstacles and intimidation (created 99% of the time from my own headspace). I told myself that my practice could be in any medium and that nothing had to be completed or finished…ever. I even called the work that I did daily ‘my sketches’ instead of ‘my paintings’. I kept my setup simple: Arches paper + acrylics for the most part. I did use a few canvases during the process but returned very quickly to paper. No easel. No painters tape to mask off the edges of the paper (consequences be damned). I told myself that I wanted to play + experiment. When I felt a rule or a sense of cautious protectiveness coming up from my gut, I deliberately did exactly what I was telling myself not to do. I dove into the concept of creating layers so that it would build a richness and interest in the sketch but also to give myself the freedom to paint right over something, even if I kind of liked it and even if I ended up losing what I liked about the previous layer. Nothing is wasted.

Participation in the group was done online and I opted to post most of my daily practices on my Instagram account. Coming out the other side of the 100 days was amazing. I think I was surprised the most by the tenderness and confidence. The group of people that participated were so kind and encouraging with one another. No one just played nice in our group, they actually were that kind and sincere. I also felt a tenderness growing in how I talked to and treated myself. I became less critical of myself during this process, more nurturing and supportive of myself. Out of that came more confidence. Confidence in knowing that the well was not running dry. Confidence that I can keep coming back no matter what happened the day before and good things will come. They just will.

I’ve heard the quote about how it’s more about the journey, not the destination, blah, blah, blah. That one has become worn out and trite for me. Except that it gained new life  during these 100 days. LeeAnn said it in a revised version that I like much better, “I hope you truly congratulate yourself on preparing a firm and steady foundation for your ever continuing soul growth and journey. When we practice, when we take time daily to invest in ourselves and in cultivating the habits and rituals that will bring more joy and beauty into our lives, we unlock and release new levels.”

Beautiful, right?

 

 

behind the critic

behind the critic

“If you find yourself criticizing other people, you’re probably doing it out of Resistance. When we see others beginning to live their authentic selves, it drives us crazy if we have not lived out our own. Individuals who are realized in their own lives almost never criticize others. If they speak at all, it is to offer encouragement. Watch yourself. Of all the manifestations of Resistance, most only harm ourselves. Criticism and cruelty harm others as well.”

— Steven Pressfield, War of Art via swissmiss

making choices

making choices

“To go wrong in one’s own way is better than to go right in someone else’s.”
→ Fyodor Dostoevsky, Crime & Punishment

When I take in this thought and explore it, it feels like a door to freedom. It feels like a tool to help extricate myself from the comparison trap (one of my all time favorite excuses).

I heard it on a podcast by Random Badassery, Episode 12: Memoirs of a Habitual Door Closer. Lots of good for the soul, get off your butt content in it. I recommend a listen.